Richard Wagner To Star In Anime Series ClassicaLoid Season Two

Written By The Wagnerian on Wednesday, 12 July 2017 | 8:22:00 am

Well, this is going to get a bit complicated. We are more than aware of the dangers of stereotyping - especially, stereotyping our more than diverse readership. However, we feel a large number of you have perhaps never experienced, in any detail, the joy, bewilderment, poetry, investigation of Jungian, existentialist, feminist, LGBT, political, themes often presented in an average Japanese animated TV series. Or for that matter,  had that feeling of occasional horror -  other times, disgust -  of its occasional misogynistic themes. Anime (the Japanese term for hand or computer created animation) is the name given to the entire genre, but within that are many, sub-genres of varying complexity. From the relative simplicity of Kodomo (children's), shōjo (girls'), shōnen (boys') anime (although even here one might find the odd reference to Jung or philosophy) right the way through the, very odd, pornography of hentai (Japanese for "pervert"). And there are many, many more classifications and subgenres, But even this makes things too simplistic as there can be much crossover, sometimes at a dizzying pace. To add to this we must say that a newcomer to anime can be further bewildered by how much it relies on the "uniqueness" of Japanse culture. This is especially so of that culture's own nature, ancestral worship based, polytheistic religion: Shinto (that description is far too simple, but this is not the place for a deep investigation). What all of this means is that watching many anime series for the first time - with their own peculiar internal logic and reliance on the viewer having an in-depth knowledge of its history, themes, and greater culture - can make watching a random episode of Twin Peaks seems like a proverbial "walk in the park." It can require a lot of work from the viewer and the need to just simply  "stick with it" early on. We mention all of this should you be, like us, the slightly Wagner "obsessive" and wish to investigate season two of the comedy anime series ClassicaLoid.  Here, Beethoven, Mozart, Chopin, Bach, Schubert - or at least their "Loids" - will be joined by a youthful Wagner and  Antonín Dvořák  - who will be appearing as a pygmy hippopotamus (told you this might get "odd")

A description can never do such a series justice and thus we have presented the "Schubert" episode below, to provide you some idea what to expect should you wish to pursue it. Crunchy Roll (one of the main, legitimate sources of subbed anime outside of Japan and where you can watch it free,  with adverts or a paid subscription -  should you find yourself pulled into this very unique world of anime.) describes the series as:

Kanae and Sosuke are two highschool students living in the suburbs in Japan where music flourishes. One day, they encounter Beethoven and Mozart, two suspicious men who call themselves ClassicaLoids. The “Musik” they play have mysterious powers, such as causing meteor showers and summoning giant robots. Kanae and Sosuke’s daily lives suddenly turn chaotic! Adding to the commotion are the appearances of other ClassicaLoids such as Bach, Chopin, Liszt, and Schubert. What is the big secret behind their powers? And are they a threat to humankind, or could they be saviors?